Bloggers, publishers and site owners of every variety in the web world love and hate to be compared and ranked against one another. It incites endless intrigue, discussion, methodology arguments and competitive behavior - but, it's amazing for earning attention. When a blogger publishes a list of "the best X" or "the top X" in their field, most everyone who's ranked highly praises the list, shares it and links to it. Here's an example from the world of marketing itself:

When strategizing about who you're writing for, consider that audience's ability to help spread the word. Some readers will naturally be more or less active in evangelizing the work you do, but particular communities, topics, writing styles and content types regularly play better than others on the web. For example, great infographics that strike a chord ( like this one), beautiful videos that tell a story (like this one) and remarkable collections of facts that challenge common assumptions (like this one) are all targeted at audiences likely to share (geeks with facial hair, those interested in weight loss and those with political thoughts about macroeconomics respectively).
Each of these sites have different rules, formats and ways of participating and sharing content. As with participation in blog or forum communities described above in tactic #2, you need to add value to these communities to see value back. Simply drive-by spamming or leaving your link won't get you very far, and could even cause a backlash. Instead, learn the ropes, engage authentically and you'll find that fans, links and traffic can develop.
Excellent article, I clicked onto it looking for info on Flickr's impacts on SEO. I use their Creative Commons search tool all of the time to look for images for posts, but I was hesitant to open my own photos up for public use. Knowing now that there is a way to search to find photos that were not linked reassures me somewhat, and it seems the added exposure is worth the risk of some going uncredited. Thanks for this, and all of the other useful info!

If you're focusing on inbound techniques like SEO, social media, and content creation for a preexisting website, the good news is you don't need very much budget at all. With inbound marketing, the main focus is on creating high quality content that your audience will want to consume, which unless you're planning to outsource the work, the only investment you'll need is your time.

A Traffic Impact Analysis, at the time of site plan approval, defines the immediate traffic impacts of the proposed development and proposes transportation improvements (public or private) to foster satisfactory levels of service on affected roads. Traffic levels exceeding Level of Service D, where the development is contributing five percent or more of the total trips, should be mitigated.
I have noticed that we get some incredible traffic for series of blog posts and the posts which answer really specific questions. I know this wasn't about content planning but honesty believe that making a schedule and focusing in on a topic of the month is a great way to break budding bloggers into the habit of posting regularly with focussed material.
Link to yourself. If you have a stockpile of blog posts you’ve already published, don’t hesitate to give them a shout-out in your new posts! Readers will be drawn deeper into your blog with each link, and be more likely to stick around and explore a bit if you provide plenty of links to your other posts. Insert them inconspicuously into your writing by turning words or phrases in a sentence into colored hyperlinks that don’t detract/distract from the rest of your content.[1]

Simply put, search engine optimization (SEO) is the process of optimizing the content, technical set-up, and reach of your website so that your pages appear at the top of a search engine result for a specific set of keyword terms. Ultimately, the goal is to attract visitors to your website when they search for products, services, or information related to your business.


Connecting the dots between marketing and sales is hugely important -- according to Aberdeen Group, companies with strong sales and marketing alignment achieve a 20% annual growth rate, compared to a 4% decline in revenue for companies with poor alignment. If you can improve your customer's' journey through the buying cycle by using digital technologies, then it's likely to reflect positively on your business's bottom line.
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