Target your "advertising." Try to promote your blog in places around the internet where people who would be interested in your blog are likely to be. If you write a post you think a friend of yours would particularly enjoy, let him or her know about it. You can even adapt you signature for different forums. If you blog about gardening and post on a forum about roses, put a link in your signature to a category or tag with all of your rose-related articles or a link to your best article about roses.

I have noticed that we get some incredible traffic for series of blog posts and the posts which answer really specific questions. I know this wasn't about content planning but honesty believe that making a schedule and focusing in on a topic of the month is a great way to break budding bloggers into the habit of posting regularly with focussed material.
The kind of content you create depends on your audience's needs at different stages in the buyer's journey. You should start by creating buyer personas (use these free templates, or try makemypersona.com) to identify what your audience's goals and challenges are in relation to your business. On a basic level, your online content should aim to help them meet these goals, and overcome their challenges.
Home of the millennials—but growing quickly in all segments as a way to drive traffic to your blog. Obviously, high-quality images are key on this platform, and not every type of business will do well on this platform (food blogging is great for Instagram). Building relationships with other influencers in your space will be one of the keys to success. If you want the inside scoop on how to do Instagram the right way, listen to this podcast episode where I sat down with a couple of travel bloggers who’ve cracked the code and learned how to drive traffic to a blog very consistently from their travel Instagram account.
Likewise, when requesting a contribution, especially from someone with a significant industry profile, asking for a very specific piece of writing is much easier than getting them to write an entire piece from scratch of their own design. You should also present statistics that highlight the value of posting on your site - traffic data, social followers, RSS subscribers, etc. can all be very persuasie to a skeptical writer.
For marketers trying to compete in this new digital medium, it’s incredibly difficult to surface your content above the competitive noise. While the amount of time consumers spend on web and mobile has increased dramatically, the amount of available content has increased exponentially. More digital content is created in a day than most people can consume in a year. With so many distractions and choices, your audience has a very short attention span.

As bloggers, we see a lot of comments. Many are spam, only a few add real value, and even fewer are truly fascinating and remarkable. If you can be in this final category consistently, in ways that make a blogger sit up and think "man, I wish that person commented here more often!" you can achieve great things for your own site's visibility through participation in the comments of other blogs.
Just a few short years ago, Google began rolling out their new Discover feature that surfaces relevant, typically news-worthy content (that tends to have very healthy on-page SEO) to users of Google’s Chrome browser application on both mobile and desktop. The best (scary) part? They use your search data—the things you’re typing into Google on a regular basis—to try and highlight new content they think you’ll want to read about. As a blogger and content publisher, this is a major opportunity to drive traffic to your blog from an extremely targeted source.

As you can see, there's all sorts of great insights to be gleaned by looking at where visits originate, analyzing how they were earned and trying to repeat the successes, focus on the high quality and high traffic sources and put less effort into marketing paths that may not be effective. In this example, it's pretty clear that Facebook and Twitter are both excellent channels. StumbleUpon sends a lot of traffic, but they don't stay very long (averaging only 36 seconds vs. the general average of 4 minutes!).
For this strategy of how to drive traffic to your website, the most important thing is finding a publication with an established base of readers. It doesn’t have to be a big name like Forbes or Entrepreneur–which will be impossible to land in the very beginning anyway. What you should focus on, is finding something that fits with your style and niche, but is still somewhat approachable in size. This’ll help you build your brand, get more recognition for the name of your blog, connect with interested readers and look great for networking possibilities. And if you play your cards right, you’ll unlock a new channel for driving traffic to your blog in the process.
Great post Moz. I really enjoyed reading your 21 tips and the 22nd is the one that really hit home. You are right about the importance of consistency. Blogs, like any other business or venture, take time to get going. I've had my ups and downs with my blog but am in it for the long haul. So thanks for reminding us to be persistant! The first 21 tips did have a lot of good information and I will continue to work on those techniques as well. Best of luck!
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