Respect other websites. People get very annoyed when it's clear that someone is using their website solely to promote a different site. If you're going to blog walk, make thoughtful comments on articles you found interesting. If you're posting in forums, read the rules and participate in discussions. Don't post just to get another link to your blog out there.
Link to yourself. If you have a stockpile of blog posts you’ve already published, don’t hesitate to give them a shout-out in your new posts! Readers will be drawn deeper into your blog with each link, and be more likely to stick around and explore a bit if you provide plenty of links to your other posts. Insert them inconspicuously into your writing by turning words or phrases in a sentence into colored hyperlinks that don’t detract/distract from the rest of your content.[1]

Avoid overwhelming your readers. When you’re full of inspiration or you have a lot to say, it can be easy to create blog posts, designs, images, and content that are overwhelming to viewers. Try to keep each individual post relatively short, breaking up broad topics into multiple, concise articles. Additionally, avoid having tons of contrasting ads, images, and links spread around the borders of your page.
In this world of instant gratification, where it is all about getting followers today and RTs on our content, the concept of needing to make it through the first 6 to 18 months is a bit foreign to the modern blogger. This year I just launched a new blog and even with years of blogging experience I find myself pulling my hair out watching the slow trickle that is my new blog's traffic. Luckily I know (and get reminded by fantastic articles such as yours) that if I stick at it I will break the barrier eventually.

Target your "advertising." Try to promote your blog in places around the internet where people who would be interested in your blog are likely to be. If you write a post you think a friend of yours would particularly enjoy, let him or her know about it. You can even adapt you signature for different forums. If you blog about gardening and post on a forum about roses, put a link in your signature to a category or tag with all of your rose-related articles or a link to your best article about roses.


Business 2 Community. This is a great place to network with other business professionals, engage with their articles, contribute guest posts and submit your own content to be shared in the forums if you get accepted. They openly encourage readers to use the platform to establish themselves and increase their exposure, which makes it a perfect fit for learning how to drive traffic to your blog from the community.
I have to say though, that (like the comment above) my favourite one was #22. Just when my brain was a little frazzled, seeing (and I mean actually visually seeing) your wife's success with her Everywhereist blog is so encouraging! If you've got something to say all you want is for people to hear it and join in the conversation and there's so many of us out there waiting to connect. It's really inspiring.
Shifting the focus to the time span, we may need to measure some "Interim Metrics", which give us some insight during the journey itself, as well as we need to measure some "Final Metrics" at the end of the journey to inform use if the overall initiative was successful or not. As an example, most of social media metrics and indicators such as likes, shares and engagement comments may be classified as interim metrics while the final increase/decrease in sales volume is clearly from the final category.
That's a screenshot of the AdAge Power 150, a list that's been maintained for years in the marketing world and receives an endless amount of discussion by those listed (and not listed). For example, why is SEOmoz's Twitter score only a "13" when we have so many more followers, interactions and retweets than many of those with higher scores? Who knows. But I know it's good for AdAge. :-)
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